Traffic Barricades Clutter The 520 Freeway Into Redmond

road construction on 520 Redmond Washington is home to some of the biggest names in business. Microsoft, Nintendo, Amazon, and many more tech startups. Washington State has long been a destination for companies looking to expand in an area that is cheaper than California but still keeps them on the West Coast. The 520 Freeway connects Redmond to Seattle and passes through areas of Kirkland and Bellevue along the way. The freeway has been under construction for years as growth in the area has surpassed the States ability to manage roadways and traffic. Just in the past few years, the 520 went from a 2 lane bridge in each direction to a 4 lane bridge. The 520 is also now a toll bridge, so commuters are now opting to go around Lake Washington to get to the northern part of Seattle. What we have noticed during this time period is an increase in traffic-related accidents. This increase in automobile accidents is caused both by the flood of residence in the area moving there and commuting to and from work daily, but also from poorly cared for roadways that erode from the constant rainfall the Seattle experiences. Washington has a yearly rainfall average of 38.19 inches of rain. This amount of rain washes out roads and causes other natural problems like mudslides that also impact the road quality. That being said, when traveling from Seattle to Redmond the 520 dumps you out either onto Leary Way or on to Avondale Road which will take you to Woodinville Washington. example of car damage The traffic becomes extremely congested in this areas as commuters use this access point to travel to and from Seattle. The poorly maintained roadways and constant road construction leave commuters dodging potholes and traffic barricades. Potholes become a major issue as vehicles crash into holes that exceed 6 inches in depth and can experience alignment and balance issues in addition to blown out tires. We spoke to a Redmond mechanic who went on to say that oil pans and axles also suffer from debris on the road. As the roads break up and the asphalt breaks loose it becomes a road hazard and bounces along the underside of moving vehicles causing damage to the parts underneath. They get hundreds of vehicles a year into their Redmond Auto Repair Shop and the issues are consistent from vehicle to vehicle. the damage caused from loose asphalt is never-ending, and the road barricades that force drivers down narrow unmaintained portions of the road are to blame. Washington State needs to fix its road problem at a rate that keeps pace with its growth, or more car owners will be spending more time at the mechanic shop.

Working together at a confidential life sciences project in Research Triangle Park, North Carolina, project engineers Devin Kennedy and Ben Salsman noticed that their customer was disposing of a few old bioreactors. Designed to grow and develop cells to extract proteins that are used to create injectable medicines, bioreactors are an important aspect of life sciences–a piece of equipment that engineers usually learn about out of a book.

Wanting to gain more hands-on MEP experience in DPR’s culture of continuous learning, Kennedy and Salsman decided to turn the discarded 60-liter bioreactor into a learning tool. With a core team of DPR’s technical experts, they brainstormed what they could do, such as adding valves and instruments, building a control panel and developing a sequence of operations. They stepped up to the biggest challenge: making the out-of-service bioreactor fully functional.

To gain more hands-on MEP experience, project engineers turned a discarded 60-liter bioreactor into a learning tool. Photo courtesy of Amy Edwards

A team of 20 project engineers in DPR’s Raleigh-Durham office set out to create a physically self-contained bioreactor on one skid and understand how its components (sensors, valves, pumps, controls, wiring) interacted in a highly controlled, pressurized environment. Through hands-on workdays led by DPR experts focused on mechanical, controls and electrical aspects of the bioreactor, the project engineers gained experience from design through commissioning.

The project engineers stepped up to the biggest challenge: making the out-of-service bioreactor fully functional. Photo courtesy of Amy Edwards

Focusing on the “why,” not just the “what,” the project engineers looked at the bioreactor as a holistic system that helped them connect to DPR’s work. They gained hands-on experience with concepts including controlled automation systems, welding and wiring–all of which reappear in projects across core markets, and all of which project engineers typically don’t get to touch with their own hands.

“Knowing how the bioreactors work, and knowing how to build them through their own experiences only makes our project engineers better team members for our customers,” said David Ross, who leads DPR’s life sciences core market in the Southeast. “On a broader level, Project Tinman helped them better understand our life science customers, as well as the perspectives of trade partners and equipment manufacturers.”

The team gained hands-on experience with concepts including controlled automation systems, welding and wiring–all of which project engineers typically don’t get to touch with their own hands. Photo courtesy of Amy Edwards

What started as an idea between two project engineers has become a learning tool that will help countless more people at DPR become better builders. Photo courtesy of Amy Edwards

This spring, about 40 women from DPR and across the industry came together to make much-needed improvements at Project Bayview, a home in San Francisco for women transitioning out of difficult situations, including homelessness, addiction and human trafficking.

As part of Rebuilding Together San Francisco’s second annual SHEBUILDS community project, the team of all-female builders, engineers, craftspeople and community volunteers worked to increase health and safety at Project Bayview, empowering women to become change-makers in their communities.

This spring, an all-female build team came together to make much-needed improvements at Project Bayview, a home in San Francisco for women transitioning out of difficult situations. Photo courtesy of Matt Pranzo

Over the course of two build days, the SHEBUILDS team completed a series of improvements to the women’s home, including:

  • Turning an empty, unmaintained backyard area into an outdoor living space, including installing a new raised deck area and landscaping to create a safe, peaceful place for women and their children;
  • Building a platform for the washer and dryer to prevent flooding;
  • Installing a new pot-filler faucet and garbage disposal in the kitchen;
  • Patching holes, drywalling, painting, caulking and organizing throughout the home.

“The great thing was not only did we have skilled carpenters on this project, but also women who just wanted to learn more and wanted to give back,” said DPR’s Renee Powers. “We had an incredibly cohesive team of all-women builders working together to create positive change for other women.”

The team turned an empty, unmaintained backyard area into an outdoor living space, including installing a new raised deck area and landscaping to create a safe, peaceful place for women and their children. Photo courtesy of Matt Pranzo

According to Heather Kusunoki, house manager at Project Bayview, some of the women living at the home joined the team to work on repairs, and were inspired working alongside and learning from the all-women team’s attention to detail and quality. One of these women now aspires to enter the trades after she finishes her program at Project Bayview, breaking a cycle of difficult situations and creating a new one: one of women empowering women to create positive change in their lives and communities.

Check out radio host Peter Finch’s podcast about the SHEBUILDS project, featuring DPR’s Vic Julian and Lea Rewinski here!

The team of all-female builders, engineers, craftspeople and community volunteers worked to increase health and safety at Project Bayview, empowering women to become change-makers in their communities. Photo courtesy of Matt Pranzo

In Ashburn, Virginia, Digital Realty’s (DLR) latest data center is rising from the ground up with tilt-up wall panels. Scheduled for completion in December 2018, the 230,000-sq.-ft. hyperscale data center is leveraging the cost and time savings of using tilt-up construction, a method in which large slabs of concrete are poured directly at the jobsite, then raised into position to form the building’s exterior walls.

DPR team
Speed-to-market is a critical factor for DLR, as the need for data centers designed to deliver services and content to support the world’s largest cloud platforms continues to grow. Photo courtesy of Ulf Wallin

Speed-to-market is a critical factor for DLR, as the need for data centers designed to deliver services and content to support the world’s largest cloud platforms continues to grow. With its customer’s needs in mind, the team chose tilt-up panels to eliminate the traditional limits of the size of panels that could be transported to the site. Since larger panels were poured onsite, less panels were needed to complete the structure, further speeding up the process. The tilt-up panels also allowed for early scope release of certain trades, specifically the plumbing and structural steel subcontractors, who installed plumbing risers and steel connections before the tilt-up panels were lifted, saving time down the road.

Tilt up wall panels
Scheduled for completion in December 2018, the 230,000-sq.-ft. hyperscale data center is leveraging the cost and time savings of using tilt-up construction. Photo courtesy of Ulf Wallin

After pouring concrete walls around the building’s perimeter, the team began lifting the walls into place this summer. The process takes approximately 45 minutes per two-story panel, with the team installing between eight to ten panels per day. It will take 105 panels and 2,000 cubic yards of concrete to complete the perimeter of the data center.

Once complete, the data center will also include the build-out of a 6MW data center hall and will ultimately host 36MW of power.

In Tampa, the DPR team at Crosstown Center Phase II celebrated the completion of vertical structural steel construction with a traditional topping out ceremony this spring.

The corporate office campus will include a 5-story, 260,000-sq.-ft. core-and-shell office building with a 7-story, 1,260 space parking garage and connecting pedestrian bridge when it is complete in late 2018. Pursuing LEED Silver certification, the campus will leverage sustainable elements such as daylighting and recycling of 75 percent of construction waste.

More than 250 guests including design team members, subcontractors, craftspeople and owners enjoyed a barbecue lunch, presentation and ceremonial signing of the final beam to be raised into the structure. DPR thanked the subcontractors and construction crew for their hard work and dedication to maintaining a safe project site.

Crosstown rendering
The corporate office campus will include a 5-story, 260,000-sq.-ft. core-and-shell office building with a 7-story, 1,260 space parking garage and connecting pedestrian bridge when it is complete in late 2018 Photo courtesy of Gensler
Dave Elrod
Dave Elrod, who leads DPR’s Tampa business unit, ceremonially signs the beam. Photo courtesy of Dave Weathers
Ceremonial beam
More than 250 guests including design team members, subcontractors, craftspeople and owners enjoyed a barbecue lunch, presentation and ceremonial signing of the final beam to be raised into the structure. Photo courtesy of Dave Weathers
Group photo
DPR thanked the subcontractors and construction crew for their hard work and dedication to maintaining a safe project site. Photo courtesy of Dave Weathers

Redwood City, California-based LEMO Foundation recently found itself in dire need of the skills that DPR’s self-perform work crews bring to the table. A charitable organization dedicated to providing a home base where underprivileged youth can feel safe, build positive relationships and develop their dreams in an environment where they can excel in academics, athletics and life skills, LEMO was in danger of losing the lease to a portion of its Redwood City facility. Because the previous owner built volleyball courts underneath power lines without PG&E consent, the organization needed the courts to be demolished and removed to maintain its lease and continue holding tournaments at its facility.

Demolition photo
DPR self-perform work teams set a scope of work, found additional help and completed demolition before LEMO Foundation’s critical deadline. Photo courtesy of Alex Saldana

DPR’s Alex Saldana was already familiar with the organization and the outstanding work it does in the community helping underprivileged student-athletes succeed in school, athletics and life in hopes of receiving college scholarships.

“I knew it was an opportunity for our SPW demo crew to participate in something that was a unique fit for our skills,” Saldana said. “A demo project is not something that comes up often for volunteer work, and it seemed like the perfect opportunity for DPR to help.”

Over the next two months, DPR’s team worked with LEMO to set a scope of work, find additional help and complete demolition before its critical deadline. Six DPR crews helped complete the demolition project in one weekend. All totaled, DPR dedicated 116 administrative hours and 100 craft hours to complete the project.

Group photo
DPR dedicated 116 administrative hours and 100 craft hours to complete the project. Photo courtesy of Alex Saldana

LEMO Foundation has since been in touch with Saldana, letting him know that the organization was able to renew its lease on the parking lot. It now has additional capacity to accommodate a surge of growth to its volleyball program, which is ranked among the leading programs in the Bay Area. LEMO also has plans to start after-school classes to expose students to potential career paths, such as education, entrepreneurship and sound engineering.

Formed as a 501(c)(3) nonprofit organization in 2008, LEMO Foundation has accomplished unique results, with 75 percent of its student-athletes earning full scholarships and 100 percent of student-athletes receiving admission to college.

LEMO Foundation site
Because of DPR’s help, LEMO Foundation was able to renew its lease and accommodate its growing volleyball program. Photo courtesy of Alex Saldana

In Durham, North Carolina, Marion Broome, PhD, RN, Dean of Duke University School of Nursing, paid a visit to personally thank the DPR crew on the progress of Duke Health’s new five-story, 103,000-sq.-ft. interdisciplinary building.

Expected to be completed in fall 2019, the building is the future home of the Duke School of Medicine’s Doctor of Physical Therapy Division, Department of Orthopaedic Surgery and the School of Nursing. The shared space aims to promote collaborative scholarship and strengthens Duke’s academic community by teaching students the value of patient-centric care across multiple medical disciplines.

“On behalf of the Duke University School of Nursing faculty and staff, we are so excited about this opportunity to do, as Duke does, to collaborate so well but to also take interprofessional education to the next level,” said Broome.

Dean Broome visits jobsite
Dean Marion Broome visited the jobsite to celebrate progress of the interdisciplinary building. Photo courtesy of Andrew Buchanan
Dean Broome visits jobsite
Dean Broome personally thanked the project team for its work on the 103,000-sq.-ft. building. Photo courtesy of Andrew Buchanan
Dean Broome visits jobsite
The team gave Dean Broome a tour of the jobsite. Photo courtesy of Andrew Buchanan
Dean Broome visits jobsite
Expected to be completed in fall 2019, the building is the future home of the Duke School of Medicine’s Doctor of Physical Therapy Division, Department of Orthopaedic Surgery and the School of Nursing. Photo courtesy of Ayers Saint Gross

Joel Bass
When DPR’s Joel Bass and his wife Wei-Bing Chen arrived at UCSF Medical Center at Mission Bay because Chen was in labor, the staff told them that it might be helpful to go for a walk around campus. It was a familiar walk for Joel Bass, who was a superintendent on the award-winning 878,000-sq.ft. ground-up hospital complex renowned for its integrated project delivery (IPD) approach and state-of-the-art patient care. After walking the very same halls where he did countless job walks during the years he worked on the hospital, the parents-to-be sat on a bench and reflected on what was to come.

On March 12, 2015, the world welcomed Tyler Bass, the first DPR baby to be born at UCSF Medical Center at Mission Bay. It was serendipitous, as the hospital had only moved deliveries into the new hospital a few days prior.

Joel and Tyler Bass
Tyler Bass was the first DPR baby to be born at UCSF Medical Center at Mission Bay. Photo courtesy of Matt Pranzo

“It brought together so many things. At DPR, we try to be integral and indispensable to our communities, and having your baby in the building you built is a way to truly become a part of the building, and use it in the way it was intended,” said Joel Bass. “It’s important to see value and meaning in the work that you do, and know that you’re contributing to something larger than yourself. It was a special experience to share what we built with my family.”

Today, Tyler Bass is three years old–old enough to recognize UCSF’s helipad from nearby Highway 280 as “the place where dad works.” With his own hard hat, vest and boots, the toddler gravitates toward anything related to construction. He’s fascinated by cars, trucks and equipment, and is always lobbying his dad to take him to the jobsite.

Wei-Bing Chen, Tyler Bass and Joel Bass visit UCSF Medical Center at Mission Bay, where Tyler Bass was born. Photo courtesy of Matt Pranzo

Joel Bass now works a few blocks away from the hospital where Tyler Bass was born, as he and the DPR team build UCSF’s new 270,000-sq.-ft. Joan and Sanford I. Weill Neurosciences Building, which will bring together lab research programs and clinical care in what will become one of the largest neuroscience complexes in the world.

On his last visit, Tyler Bass proudly told his dad that he wants to work with him some day, a dream that makes Joel Bass smile–and a dream that might come true.

Joel and Tyler Bass
Tyler Bass is fascinated by construction, and dreams of working with his dad one day. Photo courtesy of Matt Pranzo

Dan Crutchfield
When DPR’s Dan Crutchfield met his wife Lauren Crutchfield at McDaniel College in Westminster, Maryland, he had no idea what big moments life would have in store for him at the hospital a mile away.

As a superintendent at DPR, Dan Crutchfield has worked on five straight projects for Carroll Hospital Center, ranging from outpatient suites to the expansion of the labor and delivery suites, often coordinating construction work within live hospital units. On Nov. 25, 2017, after enduring a long labor and delivery process, Lauren Crutchfield gave birth to Josephine (Josie) Crutchfield in one of the very same suites built by her father.

Dan and Josie Crutchfield
On Nov. 25, 2017, after enduring a long labor and delivery process, Lauren Crutchfield gave birth to Josephine (Josie) Crutchfield in one of the very same suites built by her father. Photo courtesy of Matt Pranzo

Dan Crutchfield still works within the same building, as the DPR team builds an expansion of the hospital’s couplet care program, which enables mothers and newborns to stay together for their entire hospital stay. Nurses, doctors and hospital staff run into him almost every day and check in for updates about his wife and daughter.

“Now that I am renovating and expanding the facility where Josie was born, I gained an appreciation for what the doctors, nurses and medical staff do every day,” said Dan Crutchfield. “I’m able to see it from two different perspectives, both professional and personal.”

Crutchfield family
Dan Crutchfield, Josie Crutchfield and Lauren Crutchfield visit Carroll Hospital, where Josie was born. Photo courtesy of Matt Pranzo

A native of Carroll County, Maryland, Dan Crutchfield grew up his whole life in the community that Carroll Hospital Center serves and finds great meaning in building a facility that will positively impact so many people that he knows–including his own family. Josie Crutchfield is now six months old, and when she’s old enough, Dan Crutchfield plans to explain to her how she was born in the hospital that he built.

“I wasn’t just a contractor at a hospital. All the work I put into the expansion and renovations, I was making it better for her, and for families like ours. It was special, and a project that I will always remember.”

Dan and Josie Crutchfield
Josie Crutchfield is now six months old, and when she’s old enough, Dan Crutchfield plans to explain to her how she was born in the hospital that he built. Photo courtesy of Matt Pranzo

When it comes to introducing teen girls to the many career opportunities available in the construction industry, who better to do so than an all-female team of DPR professionals?

That’s just what took place this spring at a DPR-hosted workshop titled “You Got This!” for the Girls Empowerment Network (GEN) Austin.

The gathering was part of GEN’s Pathfinder workshop series. It marked DPR’s first one-on-one event with an organization whose mission is “to ignite the power in girls by teaching them the skills to thrive and believe in their ability to become unstoppable.” Formed in 1996, GEN has arms in Houston and Austin focused on offering rising ninth to 12th grade girls a professional development program and a head start on their road to independence, college and career.

GENaustin’s mission is to “to ignite the power in girls by teaching them the skills to thrive and believe in their ability to become unstoppable.” Photo courtesy of Diane Shelton

The half-day workshop brought together eight GEN teens with five DPR professionals at DPR’s Austin office. DPR community initiative liaison Angie Weyant said that the small group atmosphere offered ample opportunity for participants to become better acquainted as they took part in an array of interactive exercises and activities.

To kick it all off, the DPR women shared the diverse paths each had taken into construction careers ranging from project executive to project engineer, estimating, marketing and administrative roles. The girls also had a chance to watch DPR’s “Celebrating Women Who Build” video, which even featured Andrea Weisheimer, one of the workshop volunteers.

Eight GEN teens and five DPR professionals came together for a half-day workshop at DPR’s Austin office. Photo courtesy of Diane Shelton

The group then squared off on two opposing teams to play a DPR-developed game, “Operation Renovation,” a collaborative construction management game that shows players how the different roles on a construction site interact with each other.

The April workshop also included a chance for DPR volunteers and the girls to pair up for one-on-one “power chats” that honed their interview skills through rapid-fire Q&A sessions. A final exercise focused on bravery and resilience, which were key themes of the workshop.

“Bravery and resilience were great topics to reflect on, even as an adult,” Weyant said. “The girls seemed to love the workshop, and we’re looking forward to growing our relationship with them, to leverage our abilities and experiences to help further their mission and hopefully, encourage some of these bright young women to consider a construction career themselves.”

The DPR team looks forward to growing its relationship with GEN and hopefully, encourage some of these bright young women to consider a construction career themselves. Photo courtesy of Claudia Arellano

DPR recently celebrated the placement of the last structural beam for the new Serta Simmons Bedding headquarters in Atlanta, which city leaders hope will jump-start a rebirth of the Doraville area once it’s complete in early 2019.

team photo
DPR’s Serta Simmons project team celebrates the milestone placement of the last structural beam for the company’s new headquarters. Photo courtesy of Andi King Wieczynski

The project consists of a 145,000-sq.-ft., 5-story office, 70,000-sq.-ft. manufacturing/showroom facility and a 500-space, 3-level precast parking deck. Self-performing work gives DPR the ability to offer greater control and set the tone and pace for projects. This project resulted in the largest self-perform concrete undertaking to date for DPR’s southeast team.

Serta, the nation’s largest mattress company, is combining all company locations into the new 5-acre site as part of the redevelopment of the 165-acre Doraville General Motors plant, renamed Assembly. The area has been mostly vacant since the factory closed in 2008.

serta simmons hq topping out
Photo courtesy of Andi King Wieczynski

According to the Atlanta Business Chronicle, the new campus will house 500 employees for Serta Simmons Bedding and its two leading brands, Serta and Beautyrest, starting in early 2019. About 380 of the jobs at the Serta Simmons HQ are already in the Atlanta area, with another 120 Illinois-based employees being offered positions at the company’s new location.

Holder Properties is the developer for Serta’s new headquarters and Rule Joy Trammell + Rubio LLC is the building’s architect. Coordination has required the project team to collaborate with multiple agencies including the City of Doraville, the Metropolitan Atlanta Rapid Transit Authority, and the Federal Aviation Administration.

Once complete, Assembly Yards will encompass 10 million square feet of multifamily housing, creative office space, restaurants, retail, and entertainment, including the purpose-built film studio Third Rail Studios which was completed in the first phase of redevelopment.

Serta Simmons Headquarters rendering
Photo courtesy of Rule Joy Trammell + Rubio LLC

The recent topping out of the 30-story Third+Shoal project in Austin, TX marked the first time in company history that DPR self-performed all formwork and concrete work on a vertical high-rise structure.

exterior rendering
Photo courtesy of Gensler

Located in Austin’s booming new downtown business district, the 392,000-sq.-ft. Class-A office building is DPR’s first for Texas-based development partners Cielo Property Group and TIER REIT. Facebook will be the building’s primary tenant after the project completes this fall.

Working on a highly collaborative team with the clients (TIER REIT, Cielo Property Group, and BRDS), Gensler and other key firms, DPR was challenged during preconstruction to seek creative ways to save cost and time while maintaining the highest level of quality in design and construction. Together with structural engineer, Cardno Haynes-Whaley, the team devised a new approach for the tower. They transitioned from the originally designed pan slab and post-tensioned (P/T) girder on all floors to a P/T slab and beam in garage levels, and flat slab and P/T beams in the office level. The revised approach was more efficient to build and offers more aesthetic flexibility for tenants who want open space or exposed ceiling type finishes.

Cost, Time Savings
DPR was awarded the $25 million contract to perform all formwork and concrete work on the project with in-house crews. The resulting savings to the owner were substantial–shaving over $2 million from the budget and approximately two months from the schedule.

“We worked with the structural engineer to redesign the entire structure around the formwork system that was different than what most of the players in the market use,” said DPR’s Andrea Weisheimer. The modified formwork system allowed the concrete work to be installed faster and more efficiently, but proved far more complex to design and construct.

“Literally nothing on the entire 25,000-sq.-ft. floorplate is flat,” said DPR’s Kyle Weisheimer. “Everything is at a varying degree of slope or even cross slope. Building that kind of formwork is extremely complicated. The fact that we self-performed the formwork on one of the more complicated structures you will find, and did it successfully, is kind of a badge of pride if you will and speaks to our core value of innovation and thinking outside the box.”

Exterior
Photo courtesy of Mario Villeda Photography

Fundamental Delineator
Approximately 55 DPR crews self-performed the concrete formwork and installation of 35,000 cubic yards of concrete on the project, in addition to waterproofing and specialty construction product work. All totaled, DPR has delivered nearly 30 percent of the overall project with in-house forces. “With our in-house services, we can engage from the start and not have to rely on what can be an overwhelmed subcontractor market on some projects,” noted Kyle Weisheimer.

To help successfully deliver the self-perform formwork on the Third+Shoal project, DPR tapped the expertise and knowledge base of vConstruct, which specializes in providing virtual design and construction services, on the latest BIM platforms.

“We used vConstruct heavily on this job to help us coordinate and understand what we were building before we built it,” said Kyle Weisheimer. “We were able to leverage that in-house resource to take on an endeavor that we really hadn’t done before, and to do it successfully.”

Paul Byrne, director of construction at Cielo, said DPR’s ability to undertake the largescale self-perform contract delivered big benefits to the project’s bottom line.

“By having self-perform capabilities, DPR offers the expertise of a true builder on every project,” Byrne commented. “We saw this on the Third+Shoal project with concrete operations; from the onset, the team worked collaboratively through a target value design approach to yield the most effective solution given cost and schedule constraints.”

Collaborative Mindset
In addition to the project team’s strong technical design and construction know-how and their willingness to innovate, the owner, design and construction team share a collaborative mindset that helped drive the project forward since it began in 2015, according to Andrea Weisheimer. “It’s been a collective team effort to constantly look at ways to improve what we’re doing,” she said. “The goal is to have a beautiful building, but to do it a lot faster and a lot leaner. Our collaboration tools on this project really have made that possible.”

Greg Brooke, senior vice president of development with TIER REIT, pointed to that spirit of collaboration and teamwork as key success factors on a project that is now just months from completion this fall. “The DPR team we’re working with has a very strong teamwork and problem-solving mentality, and we could not be happier with the result so far,” he said. “When things come up, the team usually comes back with an appropriate and cost-effective recommendation.”

“The fact of DPR self-performing the work, really it’s seamless,” Brooke added. “I think we all row in the same direction. I think we’re going to finish this on time, on budget. It’s a huge success for us.”