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Just in time for college football season, The University of Georgia (UGA) formally unveiled its enhancements to the west end zone of Sanford Stadium, the tenth largest college football stadium in the country.

Led by DPR’s Lauren Snedeker, the project team embraced the challenges of renovating the stands, locker room, recruit club, plaza and concourse area of UGA’s beloved Bulldogs, all while over 94,000 curious fans flooded the stadium during last season’s six home games. Through careful planning every week, the team demobilized the entire jobsite prior to each game day.

The $63 million project, funded primarily by donor support, creates a new game-day experience for current and future student-athletes, as well as fans. The 120,000 sq. ft. of new and updated space includes:

  • A 10,500-sq.-ft. hospitality lounge for hosting prospective student-athletes and their guests on game days. The lounge is the first of its kind at Sanford Stadium for the Georgia football program.
  • New locker room, including fully equipped locker and shower facilities, as well as additional storage space for sports medicine, equipment and coaches’ locker rooms.
  • New plaza replacing all existing entrances in the stadium’s west end.
  • Expanded and enhanced concession and restroom facilities as well as a new video board that is 33 percent larger than the previous one.

“This extension, renovation, and expansion project has made Sanford Stadium, already one of the finest college football environments, even better,” said President Jere W. Morehead. “It is one more step that the University of Georgia is taking to reach new heights of excellence across all our athletic programs.”

President Jere W. Morehead addresses the audience during the dedication ceremony for the project. Photo courtesy of Andrew Davis Tucker
UGA officials, DPR team members and HOK wait in anticipation for the cutting of the ribbon at the ceremony. Photo courtesy of Andrew Davis Tucker
The new locker room includes fully equipped locker and shower facilities, as well as additional storage space for sports medicine, equipment and coaches’ locker rooms. Photo courtesy of Skyler Herring
The $63 million project creates a new game-day experience for current and future student-athletes. Photo courtesy of Skyler Herring

Central Arizona College (CAC) recently opened two new, ground-up facilities that DPR Construction delivered on its Signal Peak Campus in Coolidge, AZ: the Mel A. Everingham Student Union and a Science Building. CAC President Dr. Jackie Elliott, CAC Governing Board members, staff, students and the local community joined to celebrate the ribbon cutting ceremony as the new school year kicked off.

The new Student Union promises to be a new campus landmark and a destination for all students, enhancing the student experience with a modern campus hub. Architekton designed the 40,600-sq.-ft. facility to mirror the surrounding mountainous landscape with an undulating, angular roofline that provides a soaring open feel to the interior public space. The Student Union houses a full-service kitchen and cafeteria, a bookstore, student lounge, meeting rooms and the campus public safety office. An 8,900-sq.-ft outdoor seating and landscape area provides space for students to relax between classes and includes AV infrastructure to convert into an outdoor amphitheater to host large events, such as graduation.

The exterior view of the new Central Arizona College Student Union.
The new CAC Student Union’s design takes cues from the surrounding landscape. Photo courtesy of Gregg Mastorakos

Just north of the new Student Union, the new two-story, 32,250-sq.-ft. Science Building offers students and faculty a Maker Space/STEM classroom with 3D printers and robotics, teaching labs, wet and dry labs, prep room and faculty offices.

“The efficient and functional learning space of the science building is designed to draw and engage students in a 21st Century education atmosphere,” said Daniel Childers of Architekton. The building’s design offers nods to the surrounding desert with an outdoor garden and a water feature running through the building with roof drainage.

A dining area inside the new CAC Student Union
The new CAC Student Union enhances the student experience with a modern space for eating, studying and socializing. Photo courtesy of Gregg Mastorakos

It was critical for DPR to deliver both buildings in time for the start of a new school year. To help ensure the schedule was met, DPR used Digital Building Components, a Phoenix-based custom fabrication facility that uses robotic technology to precisely roll aluminum studs and build framing components. The CAC Science Building had all exterior panels fabricated at Digital Building Components and delivered sequentially for immediate installation at the project site, reducing the exterior skin installation time from four weeks down to a day and a half.

A science classroom at CAC featuring lab tables and fume hoods.
CAC students can take advantage of top notch facilities in the new science building. Photo courtesy of Gregg Mastorakos

Taking care of your home is an important investment. Purchasing a home is quite an expensive, but the landscaping, upkeep and improvements all cost money as well. You don’t want to spend that kind of money and not maintain the home; otherwise, your investment won’t pay off when you eventually sell the home. One of the most overlooked facets of home upkeep is with the home’s foundation, the very concrete upon which the house is built. Ignoring signs of foundation problems will wind up costing you a lot more than addressing them immediately, but how do you know what to look for, and what to do about it when you do see signs?

There are different types of foundation failure and different solutions to those problems but knowing that to look for helps in determining how to address the issue. Regardless of the foundation issue, the one constant is true: the longer you take to fix it, the more difficult and expensive the repair will be.

Foundations often suffer cracks due to soil settling, especially in certain climates. You will start to notice bowed or cracked walls when the soil is over-saturated and the house begins to settle. Even worse, though, is when the foundation actually sinks or drops, mainly due to the contraction and expansion of the soil underneath the home. If it rains a lot, that water soaks into the ground, expanding the soil. If the sun comes out and bakes the earth, the soil will contract. This has an obvious effect in the concrete on top of the soil, as does the age of the home. Clay dirt, like that found in the Midwestern part of the United States, is an example of expansive soil. If the water builds up around the home and then settles into the clay, it will cause structural problems. When the soil dries out, the foundation footings start to drop and the foundation walls will start to separate and crack. The older the home, the more of a likelihood there will be foundation issues, due to the years of soil changes. New homes can also have foundation issues, but that is more likely the fault of the builder and if you still have a warranty, it can be addressed before the damage is too great.

What are some above ground signs that your foundation is in distress? A good place to start is the concrete itself. Look for signs of hairline fractures, flaking concrete, gaps between the walls and the floors, sloping or sagging foundation walls and any mold, water stains or standing water. Also, leaning chimneys, cracked drywall, and misaligned trim can be major red flags. Crumbling stucco, cement or brick on the outside are also indicators that something is amiss. Check both the inside and the outside of the home for these telltale signs for structure issues. Inside the home, you may first see foundation damage upstairs, in the form of warped ceilings or buckling floors. You will also want to watch for exposed space between the walls and ceiling. If doors and windows are sticking or ill-fitting, these could also be signs that the house has settled. Using a level if you are unsure will give you the certainty you need to discover if the house has settled.

Since there is no way to control the weather to ensure the ground isn’t too wet or to dry, what can be done to make sure the foundation repair Okc under your home doesn’t suffer? The best course of action is making sure you have proper drainage from your home. If water pools around the base of your home or visible cracks redirect water to lower soil levels, the result will be excess moisture build up around the home, causing the soil under the foundation to saturate and expand. If it continues, the concrete supporting your home will slowly sift into the ground, and not necessarily at the same rate of other parts of your home! You will see obvious signs of water damage and possibly even witness that one part of your home is lower than the other. The unfortunate news: the longer you let the issue linger, the more it will cost. Even if you wait to fix the foundation itself, the seepage of water and the elements through windows and doors with gaps and cracks will wind up costing you more to maintain the home every month.

There are solutions, however, to the foundation problem but not all solutions rectify all problems! The first step in fixing foundation issues is to call an expert, a residential structural engineer, who can assess your foundation concerns and then devise a plan to fix these concerns. The contractor hired to repair the problems has to follow the plan and make sure the foundation repair Tulsa is secured. One such way of repairing the concrete under the home is to add extra steel to the concrete footers and foundation, certainly an option to discuss with the structural engineer and the contractor. If the engineer determines that your foundation has dropped or sunken, then underpinning would be an answer to that problem. This involves placing a support pier under the foundation, essentially lifting it to its regular height. There are several types of piers available; speak to the engineer regarding the best type for your home. Obviously, the number of piers depends upon the size of your home and the extent of the damage, which only becomes more expensive over time. Addressing the issue early is the best way to save money over the long run.

Owning a home can be one of life’s greatest pleasures. If you have seen the old Tom Hanks’ movie, “The Money Pit”, you know it can also suck the money, time and the very life out of you, if you let it! Being proactive with your home is the safest way to avoid costly issues in the future. Since the foundation repair companies Okc is literally the bedrock of your home, making sure it is safe and secure is imperative. Consult with experts if you encounter problems or have questions to keep your home sweet home from becoming a nuisance!

Photo courtesy of Matt Pranzo

In honor of Labor Day, DPR Construction is launching a new blog series, Builders at our Core, dedicated to sharing stories of DPR’s self-perform work teams. These builders are successfully executing complex, technical projects for some of the world’s most progressive and admired companies.

With diverse career paths, we’ll hear from people who got to where they are in very different ways, but have a few key things in common: a passion for continuous learning, growth and building great things.

The Builders at our Core series kicks off with the story of Jesus, Ruben and Isidro Guzman, three brothers who started their careers at DPR as carpenters in Reston, VA. Over the course of nearly a decade, all three have grown and developed their careers at DPR:

  • Jesus, the youngest of the Guzmans, was the first of his brothers to join DPR as a carpenter in 2008 and has since been promoted to general foreman. After hearing about DPR’s unique culture, his brothers came on board as well.
  • Ruben joined DPR as a carpenter in 2009, and went on to become a foreman, general foreman, assistant superintendent and is now a superintendent. He has also worked his way into estimating, and shares estimating duties 50/50 with another teammate in DPR’s Reston office.
  • Isidro, who prior to DPR began his career as a carpenter at age 15, joined DPR in 2010 and has since been promoted to foreman and assistant superintendent.
Guzman brothers
Over the course of nearly a decade, Isidro, Jesus and Ruben Guzman have grown and developed their careers at DPR. Photo courtesy of Matt Pranzo

The Guzmans recently shared their passion, expertise and advice for the next generation of builders with us:

Q: What do you love about construction?
Ruben: It’s never the same; every day is something different. You are never finished learning. You keep yourself busy all the time. I fell into becoming a carpenter, but I found out it was actually what I wanted to do. When I came to DPR, I saw that DPR operates differently than more traditional general contractors. I really liked that, and it was one of the things that drove me to put more effort into what I did.

Isidro: I started in construction when I was young. I didn’t have the opportunity to go to college; everybody has a different path. I like everything about construction: putting work together and working around people, as well as managing teams and empowering them to do good work.

Jesus: The big responsibility. Sometimes people don’t see it like that, but I like to have responsibilities and do my work the best that I can.

Guzman brothers
The Guzman brothers enjoy managing teams and empowering them to do good work. Photo courtesy of Matt Pranzo

Q: To be successful in your role, what skills does a person need?
Ruben: In my case, it helps me a lot to come from the field, knowing how to build things. You can see the drawings, imagine people building it and know what it takes.

Isidro: It’s important that people have experience on the actual job that they’re doing. If you have experience doing things with your hands, that makes everything easier. It’s important to prepare yourself with trainings, and do as much as you can to be successful.

Jesus: A person needs to be open-minded to learning about all kinds of work, and be able to build good relationships with all the trades.

Guzman brothers
The Guzmans encourage the next generation of builders to never give up and never stop learning. Photo courtesy of Matt Pranzo

Q: What’s your proudest moment at DPR?
Jesus: At the holiday party in 2015, I was one of ten people, including my brother Ruben, recognized for safety. I completed 10,000 work hours without any incidents. People who work at DPR do good work, and DPR takes care of them.

Ruben: It was the first year DPR did these awards in Reston, VA. It makes people proud to be one of the few recognized for the 10,000 incident-free hours.

Isidro: The most important thing when you are a leader is to get better at it. It’s not easy, and it’s a lot of responsibility. You might have 100 people onsite, working around the clock, and you are responsible for the safety of every person. You are responsible for making sure they go home to their families at the end of the day. That’s the reason I am proud of getting the job done on time and without injuries.

Q: What would your advice be for the next generation of builders entering the field?
Ruben: Never give up. Don’t believe that because you are a laborer or a carpenter, you can’t become a project engineer or superintendent. As long as you have goals, and you study, it’s possible for everybody. If you need a tool to learn, people will always help you at DPR.

Isidro: Don’t be complacent; always try to learn new things. Carpenters, think about being foremen; foremen, think about being general foremen. It’s possible. Think about it, and work hard to get it. There are a ton of possibilities.

Moving into a new house is an exciting time in your life, especially if the house is brand new and no one has ever lived there before. If you purchased the home from a new home builder, you may have been involved in the process since the very beginning. While you may have been picking out flooring and shower tiles, you assumed the home was being properly built. Unfortunately, that is not always the case, and you don’t find out about the home’s defects until after you have settled in and are living there. How can you protect yourself from costly repairs to a new home?

While the home had to pass inspection for you to live in it, there may be certain aspects of the home that are not as perfect as they may seem and they can still pass inspection. Maybe you purchase the home and determine that the small problems you are encountering with the house are ones with which you can live; the problem is, you don’t have the expertise to determine what’s a small problem and what’s a huge problem waiting to happen.

To fully assess the home’s quality, a season’s worth of wear will determine if the roof leaks in the autumn, if there’s a draft from the cracks in the windows in the winter, or you experience a power surge every time you turn on your air conditioning in the summer. New homeowners generally receive a home warranty from the builder, to cover certain aspects of the home’s structure. It’s usually broken down to cover mechanical defects, but only for a period of two years or less. If your plumbing in your bathroom is determined to be defected after this warranty expires, it is all on you to get it fixed. Other areas of your home may be covered for only the first year, like your roof or your carpet, so make sure you read and understand everything in that warranty. For instance, if it is your responsibility to have your air conditioning unit checked after six months and you do not do so, the builder can deny any reimbursement under the warranty if the unit breaks down during its first year. Note, too, that certain items will be excluded from the warranty or will make the warranty null and void. An example might be an “act of God”, like lightning hitting your home and destroying your chimney or you intentionally damage your own home; your homebuilder will not be responsible for these costs.

So what can a consumer do to ensure he or she doesn’t buy a faulty home and get stuck incurring all the costs? Since these issues can be costly, it is important to have a qualified professional on your side. It is important to have your construction defect expert Witness check your home before your warranty expires, in case there are some issues with the home. If you experience problems after the warranty expires, it still might be a good idea to have someone come out and inspect the home, just so you can determine how to best address the problem.While the homebuilder may send out an inspector of their own to assess your house, it is always a good idea to have your own impartial assessment. The inspector hired by the homebuilder works for them, and he or she may not be as diligent as you would like. Also, so defects are difficult to find; they take an expert eye, and you do not know the background of the person hired by the homebuilder. Having your own construction defect expert check out your home will give you peace of mind. Prior to your expert’s inspection, and/or the inspection by the homebuilder’s professional, make a list of all the items you perceive may be potential problems, even if they seem minute. What might seem like a minor imperfection could in fact be the beginning of a major issue. Don’t try and assess the problem yourself; leave it for the experts to sort out.

Once you have had the inspection by your construction defect expert, he or she should prepare a written assessment of your home from the rooftop and trusses all the way down to the foundation and surrounding soil. This assessment should address all the problems with your home—current and potential—so that you can put together a game plan as to how to tackle each issue. The report should also include an estimate of the repair cost; just to give you some idea as to the extent of the damage and as a counter to the number a contractor or another construction professional might throw out as a ballpark figure to fix the problem.

If it is determined that there’s a defect detected that is under warranty, make sure you address it with the homebuilder immediately, preferable my certified mail, to keep a paper trail. Take pictures, document dates and keep any communication between yourself and the homebuilder and the warranty company. If you wait, the warranty could expire, and you will then be responsible for repairing the defect yourself. Or, if a larger issue is found during the inspections, legal action might be necessary. Document these defects because the builder may be responsible due to breach of contract, if you can prove that the issue was caused by the homebuilder or that they knew there was a problem and they failed to resolve it, you may have a case. If the builder won’t honor a valid warranty or they somehow close up shop to avoid having to pay you, you can contact your state’s contractor licensing office, the Better Business Bureau, and an attorney to possibly pursue litigation measures. If it gets to this point, you may want to attempt to settle with the homeowner or, if the home is literally falling apart, see if they will buy it back from you. To dutifully pursue reimbursement, having a qualified construction defect expert provide their assessment will help your case.

Just remember, when purchasing a new home, investigate the homebuilder and their track record. Make sure you are protected and be aware of your rights as a homebuyer. Document everything, just in case you encounter a problem and enlist the help of a construction expert Witness for inspections and assessments; you are protecting your biggest investment—your home!

Working together at a confidential life sciences project in Research Triangle Park, North Carolina, project engineers Devin Kennedy and Ben Salsman noticed that their customer was disposing of a few old bioreactors. Designed to grow and develop cells to extract proteins that are used to create injectable medicines, bioreactors are an important aspect of life sciences–a piece of equipment that engineers usually learn about out of a book.

Wanting to gain more hands-on MEP experience in DPR’s culture of continuous learning, Kennedy and Salsman decided to turn the discarded 60-liter bioreactor into a learning tool. With a core team of DPR’s technical experts, they brainstormed what they could do, such as adding valves and instruments, building a control panel and developing a sequence of operations. They stepped up to the biggest challenge: making the out-of-service bioreactor fully functional.

To gain more hands-on MEP experience, project engineers turned a discarded 60-liter bioreactor into a learning tool. Photo courtesy of Amy Edwards

A team of 20 project engineers in DPR’s Raleigh-Durham office set out to create a physically self-contained bioreactor on one skid and understand how its components (sensors, valves, pumps, controls, wiring) interacted in a highly controlled, pressurized environment. Through hands-on workdays led by DPR experts focused on mechanical, controls and electrical aspects of the bioreactor, the project engineers gained experience from design through commissioning.

The project engineers stepped up to the biggest challenge: making the out-of-service bioreactor fully functional. Photo courtesy of Amy Edwards

Focusing on the “why,” not just the “what,” the project engineers looked at the bioreactor as a holistic system that helped them connect to DPR’s work. They gained hands-on experience with concepts including controlled automation systems, welding and wiring–all of which reappear in projects across core markets, and all of which project engineers typically don’t get to touch with their own hands.

“Knowing how the bioreactors work, and knowing how to build them through their own experiences only makes our project engineers better team members for our customers,” said David Ross, who leads DPR’s life sciences core market in the Southeast. “On a broader level, Project Tinman helped them better understand our life science customers, as well as the perspectives of trade partners and equipment manufacturers.”

The team gained hands-on experience with concepts including controlled automation systems, welding and wiring–all of which project engineers typically don’t get to touch with their own hands. Photo courtesy of Amy Edwards

What started as an idea between two project engineers has become a learning tool that will help countless more people at DPR become better builders. Photo courtesy of Amy Edwards

This spring, about 40 women from DPR and across the industry came together to make much-needed improvements at Project Bayview, a home in San Francisco for women transitioning out of difficult situations, including homelessness, addiction and human trafficking.

As part of Rebuilding Together San Francisco’s second annual SHEBUILDS community project, the team of all-female builders, engineers, craftspeople and community volunteers worked to increase health and safety at Project Bayview, empowering women to become change-makers in their communities.

This spring, an all-female build team came together to make much-needed improvements at Project Bayview, a home in San Francisco for women transitioning out of difficult situations. Photo courtesy of Matt Pranzo

Over the course of two build days, the SHEBUILDS team completed a series of improvements to the women’s home, including:

  • Turning an empty, unmaintained backyard area into an outdoor living space, including installing a new raised deck area and landscaping to create a safe, peaceful place for women and their children;
  • Building a platform for the washer and dryer to prevent flooding;
  • Installing a new pot-filler faucet and garbage disposal in the kitchen;
  • Patching holes, drywalling, painting, caulking and organizing throughout the home.

“The great thing was not only did we have skilled carpenters on this project, but also women who just wanted to learn more and wanted to give back,” said DPR’s Renee Powers. “We had an incredibly cohesive team of all-women builders working together to create positive change for other women.”

The team turned an empty, unmaintained backyard area into an outdoor living space, including installing a new raised deck area and landscaping to create a safe, peaceful place for women and their children. Photo courtesy of Matt Pranzo

According to Heather Kusunoki, house manager at Project Bayview, some of the women living at the home joined the team to work on repairs, and were inspired working alongside and learning from the all-women team’s attention to detail and quality. One of these women now aspires to enter the trades after she finishes her program at Project Bayview, breaking a cycle of difficult situations and creating a new one: one of women empowering women to create positive change in their lives and communities.

Check out radio host Peter Finch’s podcast about the SHEBUILDS project, featuring DPR’s Vic Julian and Lea Rewinski here!

The team of all-female builders, engineers, craftspeople and community volunteers worked to increase health and safety at Project Bayview, empowering women to become change-makers in their communities. Photo courtesy of Matt Pranzo

In Ashburn, Virginia, Digital Realty’s (DLR) latest data center is rising from the ground up with tilt-up wall panels. Scheduled for completion in December 2018, the 230,000-sq.-ft. hyperscale data center is leveraging the cost and time savings of using tilt-up construction, a method in which large slabs of concrete are poured directly at the jobsite, then raised into position to form the building’s exterior walls.

DPR team
Speed-to-market is a critical factor for DLR, as the need for data centers designed to deliver services and content to support the world’s largest cloud platforms continues to grow. Photo courtesy of Ulf Wallin

Speed-to-market is a critical factor for DLR, as the need for data centers designed to deliver services and content to support the world’s largest cloud platforms continues to grow. With its customer’s needs in mind, the team chose tilt-up panels to eliminate the traditional limits of the size of panels that could be transported to the site. Since larger panels were poured onsite, less panels were needed to complete the structure, further speeding up the process. The tilt-up panels also allowed for early scope release of certain trades, specifically the plumbing and structural steel subcontractors, who installed plumbing risers and steel connections before the tilt-up panels were lifted, saving time down the road.

Tilt up wall panels
Scheduled for completion in December 2018, the 230,000-sq.-ft. hyperscale data center is leveraging the cost and time savings of using tilt-up construction. Photo courtesy of Ulf Wallin

After pouring concrete walls around the building’s perimeter, the team began lifting the walls into place this summer. The process takes approximately 45 minutes per two-story panel, with the team installing between eight to ten panels per day. It will take 105 panels and 2,000 cubic yards of concrete to complete the perimeter of the data center.

Once complete, the data center will also include the build-out of a 6MW data center hall and will ultimately host 36MW of power.

In Tampa, the DPR team at Crosstown Center Phase II celebrated the completion of vertical structural steel construction with a traditional topping out ceremony this spring.

The corporate office campus will include a 5-story, 260,000-sq.-ft. core-and-shell office building with a 7-story, 1,260 space parking garage and connecting pedestrian bridge when it is complete in late 2018. Pursuing LEED Silver certification, the campus will leverage sustainable elements such as daylighting and recycling of 75 percent of construction waste.

More than 250 guests including design team members, subcontractors, craftspeople and owners enjoyed a barbecue lunch, presentation and ceremonial signing of the final beam to be raised into the structure. DPR thanked the subcontractors and construction crew for their hard work and dedication to maintaining a safe project site.

Crosstown rendering
The corporate office campus will include a 5-story, 260,000-sq.-ft. core-and-shell office building with a 7-story, 1,260 space parking garage and connecting pedestrian bridge when it is complete in late 2018 Photo courtesy of Gensler
Dave Elrod
Dave Elrod, who leads DPR’s Tampa business unit, ceremonially signs the beam. Photo courtesy of Dave Weathers
Ceremonial beam
More than 250 guests including design team members, subcontractors, craftspeople and owners enjoyed a barbecue lunch, presentation and ceremonial signing of the final beam to be raised into the structure. Photo courtesy of Dave Weathers
Group photo
DPR thanked the subcontractors and construction crew for their hard work and dedication to maintaining a safe project site. Photo courtesy of Dave Weathers

Redwood City, California-based LEMO Foundation recently found itself in dire need of the skills that DPR’s self-perform work crews bring to the table. A charitable organization dedicated to providing a home base where underprivileged youth can feel safe, build positive relationships and develop their dreams in an environment where they can excel in academics, athletics and life skills, LEMO was in danger of losing the lease to a portion of its Redwood City facility. Because the previous owner built volleyball courts underneath power lines without PG&E consent, the organization needed the courts to be demolished and removed to maintain its lease and continue holding tournaments at its facility.

Demolition photo
DPR self-perform work teams set a scope of work, found additional help and completed demolition before LEMO Foundation’s critical deadline. Photo courtesy of Alex Saldana

DPR’s Alex Saldana was already familiar with the organization and the outstanding work it does in the community helping underprivileged student-athletes succeed in school, athletics and life in hopes of receiving college scholarships.

“I knew it was an opportunity for our SPW demo crew to participate in something that was a unique fit for our skills,” Saldana said. “A demo project is not something that comes up often for volunteer work, and it seemed like the perfect opportunity for DPR to help.”

Over the next two months, DPR’s team worked with LEMO to set a scope of work, find additional help and complete demolition before its critical deadline. Six DPR crews helped complete the demolition project in one weekend. All totaled, DPR dedicated 116 administrative hours and 100 craft hours to complete the project.

Group photo
DPR dedicated 116 administrative hours and 100 craft hours to complete the project. Photo courtesy of Alex Saldana

LEMO Foundation has since been in touch with Saldana, letting him know that the organization was able to renew its lease on the parking lot. It now has additional capacity to accommodate a surge of growth to its volleyball program, which is ranked among the leading programs in the Bay Area. LEMO also has plans to start after-school classes to expose students to potential career paths, such as education, entrepreneurship and sound engineering.

Formed as a 501(c)(3) nonprofit organization in 2008, LEMO Foundation has accomplished unique results, with 75 percent of its student-athletes earning full scholarships and 100 percent of student-athletes receiving admission to college.

LEMO Foundation site
Because of DPR’s help, LEMO Foundation was able to renew its lease and accommodate its growing volleyball program. Photo courtesy of Alex Saldana